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  1. Be aware that many chemicals commonly used around the home are toxic. Select less toxic alternatives. Use non-toxic substitutes wherever possible.
  2. Buy chemicals only in the amount you expect to use, and apply them only as directed. More is not better.
  3. Take unwanted household chemicals to hazardous waste collection centers; do not pour them down the drain. Pouring chemicals down the drain may disrupt your septic system or else contaminate treatment plant sludge.
  4. Never pour unwanted chemicals on the ground. Soil cannot purify most chemicals, and they may eventually contaminate runoff.
  5.  Use low-phosphate or phosphate-free detergents.
  6. Use water-based products whenever possible.
  7. Leftover household pesticide? Do not indiscriminately spray pesticides, either indoors or outdoors, where a pest problem has not been identified. Dispose of excess pesticides at hazardous waste collection centers.
  8. Clean up after your pets. Pet waste contains nutrients and pathogens that can contaminate surface water.
  9. Drive only when necessary. Driving less reduces the amount of pollution your automobile generates. Automobiles emit tremendous amounts of airborne pollutants, which increase acid rain; they also deposit toxic metals and petroleum byproducts into the environment. Regular tune-ups and inspections can help keep automotive waste and byproducts from contaminating runoff. Clean up any spilled automobile fluids.
  10. Recycle used oil and antifreeze by taking them to service stations and other recycling centers. Never put used oil or other chemicals down storm drains or in drainage ditches. (One quart of oil can contaminate up to two million gallons of drinking water!)